Physics
206 Results based on your selections.
Electrons usually move more freely at higher temperatures. But they have now been observed to ‘freeze’ as the temperature rises, in a system consisting of two stacked, but slightly misaligned, graphene sheets. In a paper published today in Nature, Brown University Assistant Professor of Physics Jia Leo Li and his colleagues find evidence of a Pomeranchuk-type mechanism in which the liquid ground state freezes upon increasing the temperature in twisted bilayer graphene and related systems.
Read Article
New research in the journal Science describes a technique that weakens the repulsive force between electrons in “magic-angle” graphene superconductors, providing physicists with exciting new details about this strange state of matter.
Read Article
Imagine

Imagine 2020

Read the latest issue of our department magazine covering AY 2019-2020.
Read Article
Recent events, including the death of George Floyd, have attracted the attention of many theorists (physicists interested in fundamental physics - High Energy Theory, string theory, etc.), to focus on issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion within STEM generally, and within fundamental physics specifically.
Read Article
To mitigate the pandemic’s impact, the University will allow undergraduates back for two terms in a three-term model, reduce the density of students in campus housing, offer instruction in person and remotely, and implement extensive testing, tracing and public health measures.
Read Article
American Physical Society

Prof. Dmitri Feldman named APS Outstanding Referee

Prof. Dmitri Feldman has been named a 2020 APS Outstanding Referee. Honorees are selected based on the quality, number, and timeliness of their reports.

The Outstanding Referee program was instituted in 2008 to recognize scientists who have been exceptionally helpful in assessing manuscripts for publication in the APS journals. The highly selective Outstanding Referee program annually recognizes about 150 of the roughly 71,000 currently active referees.
Read Article
The worldwide response of moral revulsion triggered by the broad dissemination of a video showing the extrajudicial execution of Mr. George Floyd (as the crescendo to far too many such occurrences) has compelled even the organizers of the ‘Strings 2020’ conference to engage me in this conversation for their global cyberspace attendees. Thus, I feel a duty to respond.
Read Article
A research team has predicted the presence of “topologically protected” electromagnetic waves that propagate on the surface of plasmas, which may help in designing new plasma systems like fusion reactors.
Read Article
American Physical Society

APS Virtual April Meeting

Registration is now open for the virtual APS April Meeting, which will be held online April 18 - 21. Attendance is free of charge and open to APS members and non-members. Simply register to connect.
Read Article
Healthy Brown

Latest Brown COVID-19 Info

The Physics Department is currently closed. All members are working remotely and can be reached via email. For latest updates on COVID-19, please visit Brown University's Covid-19 webpage.
Read Article
A study provides new details about the collective motion of individual agents in a liquid-crystal-like system, which could help in better understanding bacterial colonies, structures and systems in the human body, and other forms of active matter.
Read Article
Brown University Department of Physics YouTube

International Women's Day 2020

Celebrating the womxn in our department and the many contributions they make to our community.
Read Article
Congratulations to Prof. Jia (Leo) Li, Prof. Kemp Plumb, Prof. Dmitri Feldman, Prof. Brad Marston, Prof. Meenakshi Narain, and Prof. Gregory Tucker.
Read Article
The Physics DUG, in collaboration with Yale’s Society of Physics Students, co-hosted Brown’s first Society of Physics Students Zone Meeting from Friday to Saturday October 23-24, 2020.
Read Article
The proposed detector would use superfluid helium to explore mass ranges of dark matter particles thousands of times smaller than current large-scale experiments can detect.
Read Article